THE ARTIFACTS OF ADVENTURE
FIRST NATIONS

FIRST_NATION_FB_COVER

The First Nations are the various Aboriginal peoples who are neither Inuit nor Métis. There are currently 634 recognized First Nations governments or bands spread across Canada, roughly half of which are in the provinces of Ontario and British Columbia. North American indigenous peoples have cultures spanning thousands of years and were a major source of inspiration permeating many of the prints in the Volume 11: “Hellbound In Clayoquot Sound” Collection.

Van-Isle-Roark-Revival
Van Isle Woven: Inspired by one of many of Vancouver Island indigenous designs, it’s time to start building the bonfire, uncorking the whiskey and loading the guns for the night’s ceremony. Printed oxford long sleeve woven.
First Nation Woven: As with the “First Nation” board shorts, this woven was inspired by the tribes that inhabited Vancouver Island’s coast for thousands of years.
First Nation Boardshorts: Sitting on the bow of the YAG, in his “First Nation” inspired trunks as the old ship motored 100 meters off the coast, Roark could not help but think of the Nuu-Chah-Nulth tribe that has occupied the coast of Vancouver Island for thousands of years.

The Coast Salish peoples are a group of ethnically and linguistically related Indigenous peoples of the Pacific Northwest Coast, living in British Columbia, Canada and the states of Washington and Oregon in the United States. The Coast Salish cultures differ considerably from those of their northern neighbors. It is one of the few indigenous cultures along the coast with a patrilineal rather than matrilineal kinship system, with inheritance and descent passed through the male line. They speak one of the Coast Salish languages and display a fine and fulfilling balance between man, woman, and the natural and supernatural worlds. Belief in guardian spirits and shape shifting, or transformation between human and animal spirits were widely shared in myriad forms. Vision quest journeys involving other states of consciousness were varied and widely practiced…

Salish woven basket Photo: Burke Museum

Of all peoples of the North West coast the Haida were the best carvers, painters, canoe and house builders. They still earn considerable money by selling carved objects of wood and slate to traders and tourists. Standing in the tribe depended more on the possession of property so that interchange of goods took place and the people became sharp traders. Haida society continues to produce a robust and highly stylized art form, a leading component of Northwest Coast art. While frequently expressed in large wooden carvings (totem poles), Chilkat weaving, or ornate jewellery…

009 Haida boys near totem poles, canoes and houses at Howkan village, Long Island, Alaska, ca 1897
Ornate totem poles at a Haida village around the 1900’s.

The Nuu-chah-nulth, also called Nootka, are one of the Indigenous peoples who live on what is now the southwest coast of Vancouver Island. Their name means “along the mountains.” Like several other Northwest Coast Aboriginals, the Nuu-chah-nulth were whale hunters, employing special equipment such as large dugout canoes and harpoons with long lines and sealskin floats. The whale harpooner was a person of high rank, and families passed down the magical and practical secrets that made for successful hunting. Many features of this whaling complex suggest ancient ties with Eskimo and Aleut cultures…

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Named after the Nuu-Chah-Nulth, Nootka Island, is on the Northern end of the Calyoquot Sound of Vancouver Island.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Van Isle Woven (RW274-GRY)

Inspired by one of many of Vancouver Island indigenous designs, it’s time to start building the bonfire, uncorking the whiskey and loading the guns for the night’s ceremony. Printed oxford long sleeve woven. Shop Now

 

First Nation Woven (RW278-NAT)

As with the “First Nation” board shorts, this woven was inspired by the tribes that inhabited Vancouver Island’s coast for thousands of years. Shop Now

 

First Nation Boardshort (RB221-BLU)

Sitting on the bow of the YAG, in his “First Nation” inspired trunks as the old ship motored 100 meters off the coast, Roark could not help but think of the Nuu-Chah-Nulth tribe that has occupied the coast of Vancouver Island for thousands of years.